Friday, Session Abstracts

Session Abstracts, Friday, September 18th – (7.0 CEUs Total)

Session: Morning Plenary : 8:30 – 10:00 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 
The Science of Integration
Speaker:
 
Susan T. Azrin, PhD, Program Chief, Primary Care Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health
Summary:
 The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) supports a robust research program on the delivery and effectiveness of mental health services in general healthcare settings. The NIMH also has a growing research program on improving health and reducing premature mortality in people with severe mental illnesses. This session will highlight mental health/primary care research findings, emerging trends, and future research directions.

10:20 – 11:50 a.m. Breakout Session 3

Session: 301 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 ETHICS: Spirituality, Faith-based Issues and Ethical Mental Health Treatment
Speakers:
 Julie Summers, MSW, MDiv, PhD, Mental Health Association Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK
Jeffrey D. Rediger, MD, MDiv, Medical and Clinical Director, McLean SE and Community Programs, McLean Hospital and Chief of Psychiatry, Good Samaritan Medical Center, Cambridge, MA
Summary:
 Integrating spirituality into assessment and treatment can be uncomfortable, yet addressing spiritual concerns and faith-based dilemmas may be critical to recovery. This panel presentation will review current research related to incorporating spirituality into mental health treatment, highlighting specific faith-based or spiritually-focused issues that may emerge and explore the ethical dilemmas related to these issues.

Session:  302 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Interdisciplinary Partnerships: Integrating Health, Behavioral Health and Legal
Speakers:
 Autumn De Silva, MSW, OU Physicians, Tulsa, OK
Gena Roberts Massey, MSSW, LCSW, LSW-ADM, OU Physicians, Tulsa, OK
April M. Merrill, JD, Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma, Broken Arrow, OK
Becky Robertson, MSW, LMSW, OU Physicians, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 Legal Aid Services of Oklahoma and the University of Oklahoma created the State’s first Medical-Legal Partnership in 2008. We have developed a unique integrated care model that includes legal care, social work, health care, nutrition support and other specialties, as needed. Participants will hear from a multi-disciplinary team about the benefits of collaborative, trauma-informed care.

Session:  303 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Achieving Whole Health: Integration of Peer Support in the Private Health Sector
Speakers:
 Andrew Bertagnolli, PhD, Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA
Patrick Hendry, Mental Health America, Alexandria, VA
Summary:
 Kaiser Permanente (KP) and Mental Health America (MHA) have joined together in integrating the power of behavioral health peer support into KP’s comprehensive approach to whole health for its’ members. Peer providers can play many roles in support for people living with mental psychiatric disorders and addictions.

Session:  304 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Reading, Health Literacy, and Public Health: What You Don’t Know
Speakers:
 James M. Lee, PhD, MPH, Tulsa, OK
Cleo T. Berninger, Adult Literacy Specialist, Tulsa City-County Library System, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 Health literacy has been a popular topic in the health field recently, but there has been little discussion about how about how to teach providers to screen and identify low literacy patients and to identify how low literacy impacts their overall health. What the provider says is often not heard, understood, or complied with by low literacy patients.

Session:  305 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Treating the Whole Person: Integrative Healthcare within a Private Clinic
Speakers:
 Dustin Palmer, MSW, LCSW, Carey Clinic, Tulsa, OK
Sarah Hutcherson, MSN, APRN, Carey Clinic, Sand Springs, OK
Summary:
 The workshop will start with introductions and background information about the clinic we work at, and how we have collaborated services of primary healthcare and mental health services for our patients. This includes what the sources are saying about collaborating care and how it is cost effective for patients. Next, the workshop will look into how to implement mental health services into a private clinic setting, and what has to be done through the state of Oklahoma in order to be recognized as a behavioral health group in order to bill for behavioral health services. Next, the workshop will go into patients we treat and how they feel all of their needs are being met through having the services all in one location. This part will include patient feedback and satisfaction surveys that have been administered to patients receiving both services. The session will end in questions and thoughts from participants in the sessions for them to gain knowledge from areas they may want to know more about during our presentation.

Session:  306 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Preventing Suicide through Community Collaboration: A Call to Action
Speakers:
 Stella Shoff, Bartlesville, OK
Kym Puga, EdD, Bartlesville, OK
M’Liss Jenkins, MS, LPC, LMFT, LBP, Washington County Suicide Prevention Coalition, Bartlesville, OK
Summary:
 This interactive workshop explores how Washington County locals reduced the rate of suicide from 22 per 100,000 to 16.3/100,000 by working collaboratively to implement multiple national strategies. Hear powerful testimony and video from survivors and professionals on how their tragic loss spurred their passion, sweat and tears into lifesaving community change. When you attend this workshop, you will be empowered with the tools and understanding to change your community too!

Session:  307 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Physical Aspects of Psychiatric Illness, Psychiatric Aspects of Physical Illness
Speaker:
 Scott Grantham, MD, Saint Francis Health System, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 Participants will receive information regarding physical health complications that often accompany psychiatric illness or its treatment. Participants will also learn about physical health conditions that often first come to the attention of mental health providers, because of changes in thinking or behavior. Participants will engage in conversation about how to best address the entire health and wellbeing of patients, within the fragmented structures of modern healthcare delivery systems.

Session:  308 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 eSBIRT: The Key to Primary Care Integration
Speakers:
 Frannie Pryor, MSW, LCSW, LADC, CM, Community Health Centers, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK
Dane Libart, LCSW, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Oklahoma City, OK
Sterling Lanier, Tonic Health, Palo Alto, CA
Summary:
 This three-part Health Center case study provides everything needed to implement an electronic Screening Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (eSBIRT) protocol. For over 25 years SBIRT has demonstrated effectiveness in reducing risky alcohol consumption. Part I, covers the basics of SBIRT. Part II, is the ipad patient screening implementation story with a review of the first year’s results. Part III, is a demonstration and discussion of the technology running the application. eSBIRT seamlessly delivers scored screening results to providers, uncovers a variety of previously un-recognized critical health issues.

Session:  309 10:20 – 11:50 a.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 A Multidisciplinary Collaborative Model
Speakers:
 Mary Rineer, PhD, Licensed Psychologist, CAPES, Inc., Tulsa, OK
Kim Terry, MD, Broken Arrow Pediatrics, Broken Arrow, OK
Chris Puls, MD, Shadow Mountain Behavioral Health System, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 What is multidisciplinary collaborative care? How do I utilize this model within my practice? Will this model really work in my practice? You will leave this workshop with a comprehensive multidisciplinary client intake form. You will select strategies for data collection documenting the benefits of the multidisciplinary collaborative care model. Finally, you will develop a multidisciplinary collaborative model and a team for implementation within your institution, practice or community.

Session: Working Lunch Plenary/Facilitated Panel Discussion : 12:00 – 1:45 p.m. (1.25 CEUs)
Title:
Addressing Comorbidities: Improving Outcomes through Collaboration
Speaker:
TBA
Panel: 
Gerard Clancy, MD, Vice President/Dean, College of Health Sciences, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK
Gary Cox, JD, Executive Director, Oklahoma City County Health Department
Joseph Cunningham, MD, FACOG, Vice President Health Care Delivery/Chief Medical Officer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma, Tulsa, OK
Bruce Dart, PhD, Executive Director, Tulsa Health Department, Tulsa, OK
Jack Sommers, MD, MBA, Senior Vice President/Chief Medical Officer, CommunityCare, Tulsa, OK
Summary: 
There is a strong argument that better management of comorbidities leads not only to improved outcomes, but also reduced costs. Co-morbid disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and substance abuse commonly live alongside chronic pain and poor health. As such, primary care settings have become a gateway to the behavioral health system. Likewise, individuals living with serious mental illness, substance use, and co-occurring disorders, often die, not from their mental health related issues, but from untreated and preventable chronic illnesses frequently aggravated by poor health habits. This session will explore strategies and opportunities for prevention, identification, intervention, management and treatment of co-morbid disorders, including collaborative approaches to integrated care designed to address the needs of the whole person.

2:05 – 3:35 p.m. Breakout Session 4

Session: 401 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 ETHICS: Health Information Exchanges and Consent: To Whom Are You Giving It?
Speakers:
 Ricky T. Munoz, JD, MSW, University of Oklahoma School of Social Work, Tulsa, OK
Mark Fox, MD, PhD, MPH, Indiana University School of Medicine, South Bend, IN
Summary:
 Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) are growing in number as a response to the need to reduce health care costs (Adler-Milstein et al., 2013). HIEs are computer networks that allow for easier transmission of electronic medical records (EMR) from practice to practice, holding promise as a means to reduce costs associated with inefficient care (Adler-Milstein et al., 2013). HIEs are particularly valuable when they deliver economies of scale, meaning that the more people included, the greater the cost savings. However, patient consent to participate in an HIE create unique ethical questions regarding balancing the value of greater participation with patient autonomy, and the role HIPAA plays in determining who is a part of the patient’s care team. Concerns surrounding consent include the ethics of industry models that “nudge” patients into HIEs, and the balancing of public benefit with basic principles of respect for patient’s autonomy (Munoz, Fox, & Gomez, 2013). Related issues that will be discussed will include HIPAA laws and the definition of who constitutes a health care team under the law in relation to HIEs. The outcome for participants will be a better understanding of HIE’s operations and associated ethical issues surrounding patient consent, with an eye on helping practitioners to be more equipped to have informed discussions with clients and policymakers surrounding consent and HIEs.

Session: 402 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Medication Assisted Therapy for Substance Use Disorders: Integration into Existing Treatment Models
Speakers:
 Bryan Van Doren, MD, FACP, OU Physicians, Tulsa, OK
William Yarborough, MD, FACP, OU School of Community of Medicine, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 Addiction as defined by the American Society of Addiction Medicine as a chronic brain disorder, will be presented and discussed. Simple schematics of brain pathways, along with how medications may affect these pathways will be discussed. Specific data and mechanisms of each medication discussed will be presented. Evidence, including presenters own studies will be shared. Finally experience with integration of these medications with existing treatment modalities, as well as suggestion about new models will be presented.

Session: 403 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Completing the Puzzle: Necessary Pieces of Behavioral/Primary Healthcare Integration
Speakers:
 Mary Colleran, MSW, Trilogy, Inc., Chicago, IL
Alice Geis, DNP, APN, Trilogy, Inc., Chicago, IL
Summary:
 Integrating behavioral health and primary care services is extremely complex and goes beyond co-location of services. Developing a sustainable model of care that results in improved outcomes requires time, energy, commitment and a variety of practical tools and workflow adaptations. Using the successful Trilogy Heartland Integrated Healthcare Program as model, participants in this session will learn how to break down the complex puzzle of Integrated Healthcare into practical pieces that can be operationalized in any program. This session will cover various aspects of integration including culture, strategic partnerships, sustainability planning, workforce development, peer involvement, and wellness services. In addition, the session will stress the importance of managing with outcomes to achieve program success.

Session: 404 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Exploring Sizeism and Fat Bias as Barriers to Wellness
Speakers:
 Tonya R. Hammer, PhD, LPC-S(TX), Oklahoma State University – Tulsa, Tulsa, OK
Kathleen Verba, MS, Doctoral Candidate, Oklahoma State University – Tulsa, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 Participants will explore the constructs of sizeism and fat bias as it applies to larger sized individuals seeking wellness in mind, body, and spirit. Current literature and research studies will be highlighted as participants consider current barriers to wellness services larger sized individuals experience. Participants will become more familiar with micro aggressions experienced as the result of sizeism and fat bias by larger sized individuals.

Session: 405 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Integration of Behavioral Healthcare into the Primary Care Practice
Speaker:
 Jack Sommers, MD, MBA, CommunityCare, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 This workshop will focus on the integration model of utilizing a Behavioral Integration Consultant (BIC) in primary care settings, including the integration and implementation of mental health screenings, short-term interventions, and utilization of the BIC. Billing and reimbursement possibilities, along with potential related pitfalls when integrating behavioral healthcare into a primary care practice will also be discussed.

Session: 406 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Calm the Body/Ease the Mind: Treating Victims of Intimate Partner Violence
Speakers:
 Crystal Brill, MS, LPC, Domestic Violence Intervention Services, Tulsa, OK
Missy Iski, MA, LPC, LMFT, Domestic Violence Intervention Services, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 Intimate partner violence affects the survivors in a variety of physical and emotional ways. This workshop will look at the impact of IPV on adult and child survivors and how to assist the healing process by working with physical and emotional safety. Participants will learn about the three stages of healing and how to employ grounding, mindfulness, and calming skills with adult and child clients in each stage. In addition, participants will learn about assessment measures as well as treatment strategies to guide recovery. Participants will participate in several experiential exercises to demonstrate how skills can be effectively taught to clients.

Session: 407 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 More than Talk Therapy? The New Generation of Mental Health Professionals
Speakers:
 Alicia Irvin, PhD, Licensed Psychologist, Jack C. Montgomery Medical Center, Muskogee, OK
Jeffrey W. Martindale, PhD, Licensed Psychologist, Langston University, Stillwater, OK
Leah Collins, LCSW, Jack C. Montgomery Medical Center, Muskogee, OK
Summary:
 What would it be like to play an integral part within a medical team as a mental health professional? Furthermore, how do you capitalize on your strengths as a Psychologist or other mental health professional within a medical setting? The breadth of opportunities for mental health professionals in medical settings will be explored from clinical to administrative. Participants will leave with a greater understanding of the skills and traits necessary to be successful within medical settings. The evidence for the impact of behavioral health specialists in medicine will be addressed as well as the expertise of the presenters who have practiced in multiple medical settings themselves.

Session: 408 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Behavioral Health Information Exchange: Myths, Pitfalls, Stigma and Opportunity
Speakers:
 Joe Walker, CISSP, MyHealth Access Network, Owasso, OK
Tracy Leeper, MA, Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, Oklahoma City, OK
David Kendrick, MD, MPH, University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine, Tulsa, OK
Teresa Meinders Burkett, JD, Conner & Winters, LLP, Tulsa, OK
Matt Meyer, MD, Laureate Psychiatric Clinic and Hospital, Tulsa, OK
Erik Vanderlip, MD, MPH, FAPA, University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 Discussants will address a variety of common Health Information Technology questions and concerns through guided discussion with a moderator as well as audience participation. The topics will range from technical definitions and capabilities, updates in national incentive programs and state-wide efforts, historical context and current legal regulations in place, to emerging philosophies of care and potential changes in legal policy on the horizon.

Session: 409 2:05 – 3:35 p.m. (1.5 CEUs)
Title:
 Oklahoma Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment
Speaker:
 Jan M. Slater, JD, MBA, University of Oklahoma School of Community Medicine, Tulsa, OK
Summary:
 The Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment(POLST)is a physicians order form adopted in 29 states that gives patients control over their care by specifying the types of medical treatment they want to receive during serious illnesses.A multidisciplinary task force of 35 Oklahoma professionals is working to introduce POLST to the healthcare industry in Oklahoma to encourage communication between healthcare providers and patients,enable patients to make more informed decisions and clearly communicate decisions to providers. POLST has been effective to prevent unwanted or medically ineffective treatment, reduce patient and family suffering,and help ensure that patient wishes are honored

Session: Closing Plenary : 3:50 – 5:05 (1.25 CEUs)
Title:
 
Integrating Spirit: The Higher Aspects of Being Human
Speaker:
 Jeffrey D. Rediger, MD, MDiv, Medical and Clinical Director, McLean SE and Community Programs, McLean Hospital and Chief of Psychiatry, Good Samaritan Medical Center, Cambridge, MA
Summary:
 
According to the World Health Organization, “Health is more than the absence of disease. Health is a state of optimal well-being.” Achieving wellness goes beyond physical, emotional and mental health. Spiritual wellness and fulfillment is an integral part of being human, and contributes to resilience and one’s ability to flourish. In 1999, the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Objectives Report III defined Spirituality as follows: “Spirituality is recognized as a factor that contributes to health in many persons. The concept of spirituality is found in all cultures and societies. It is expressed in an individual’s search for ultimate meaning through participation in religion and/or belief in God, family, naturalism, rationalism, humanism and the arts. All these factors can influence how patients and health care professionals perceive health and illness and how they interact with one another.” Medicine is focusing increased attention on the relationship between clients’ spiritual needs and the more traditional aspects of their medical care. This presentation will explore the connection between spirituality and health, including the implementation and role of spirituality in integrated healthcare. Psychospiritual and other spiritually-oriented practices and interventions that can be integrated into behavioral health practices and primary care settings will be addressed.